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What Does the Brexit Mean For My Holidays?

On Thursday 23rd June Britain voted in favour of leaving the European Union, making us the first nation state to ever do so. Nobody knows yet what the long term impacts of the Brexit will be, but one of the big questions a lot of people are asking right now is, will it affect my summer holiday?

The most important thing to remember is that the UK will not officially start to withdraw from the EU until we trigger Article 50, and from then it will take up to 2 years to fully negotiate the terms of leaving. This means that very little is likely to change during this time and your holiday plans will be able to go on mostly as normal. ABTA, the UK’s largest travel association, has released an official statement answering all the questions you might have about how the Brexit will impact your travel plans, and we’re sharing their advice right here.

How will Brexit affect my holiday?

Until the UK officially leaves the EU, not sooner than two years’ time, there will be no changes to holiday arrangements. Travellers are as free to move between the UK and the EU as they were before the vote, European Health Insurance cards remain valid and regulations such as Air Passenger Rights remain in place.

I’m going to Europe this summer, is my passport still valid?

Yes. Until the UK officially leaves the EU, not sooner than two years’ time, there will be no changes to passports.

I’ve booked a holiday for next year – do I need to do anything?

No. Until the UK officially leaves the EU, not sooner than two years’ time, there will be no changes to holiday arrangements.

Do I need to get a new passport?

No. Until the UK officially leaves the EU, not sooner than two years’ time, there will be no change to passport arrangements.

Which queue will I go into at the airport – EU passports or all others?

The same queue as you did before the vote. Until the UK officially leaves the EU, not sooner than two years’ time, there will be no change to passport arrangements.

Do I need a visa to go to Spain?

No. Until the UK officially leaves the EU, not sooner than two years’ time, there will be no change to passport arrangements.

What about my European Health Insurance Card (EHIC)?

You can still use your EHIC card abroad. There will be no immediate changes to using your EHIC card abroad. Arrangements between the UK and other EU countries will have to be reached once the UK officially leaves the EU.

Can I still get compensation if my flight is delayed or cancelled?

Yes. There will be no immediate changes to claiming compensation if your flight is delayed or cancelled. The UK Government will need to implement a new law on compensation for flight delays and compensation after we leave the EU.

What about duty free? Can I still bring goods home?

You can still bring home unlimited goods until we officially leave the EU.  The free movement of goods will be part of a negotiated settlement with the EU.

What about using my mobile phone abroad? Will roaming charges increase?

There will be no immediate changes to using your phone abroad, and there won’t be an immediate impact on charges. The UK Government will need to implement a new law on roaming charges after we leave the EU, otherwise the service providers will be free to set roaming charges.

Can I still take money out from cashpoints abroad?

Yes, you can continue to take out cash abroad as normal.

Will it be more expensive to go on holiday abroad?

Not necessarily. If you are travelling abroad and you have already paid for all of your travel arrangements, as part of a package holiday for example, then you will be protected to a large degree from a drop in the value of the pound. However, your spending power while abroad will be impacted in the event of a weaker pound, making it more expensive to buy things not included in your holiday package like meals, drinks and souvenirs.

What does this mean for the price of my holiday abroad?

If you are travelling abroad and you have already paid for all of your travel arrangements, as part of a package holiday for example, then you will be protected to a large degree from a drop in the value of the pound. People paying for overseas accommodation in other currencies (e.g. in euros or dollars) can expect to pay more in the event of a weaker pound. 

Will the cost of flights increase?

A weaker pound may impact the cost of flights in the short term. In the longer term the UK Government will seek to negotiate full access to the EU’s common aviation market, which has delivered the open skies arrangements we have today.

All information sourced from abta.com.

Do you have any other comments or concerns regarding your holiday post-Brexit? Comment below and we'll try our best to answer any questions you may have!